Feb
1
Wed
African American History Month
Feb 1 all-day
African American History Month

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society.

As a Harvard-trained historian, Carter G. Woodson, like W. E. B. Du Bois before him, believed that truth could not be denied and that reason would prevail over prejudice. His hopes to raise awareness of African American’s contributions to civilization was realized when he and the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), conceived and announced Negro History Week in 1925. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The response was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all color on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations. And the association—now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)—continues to promote the study of Black history all year.

Greensboro Woolworths Counter Sit-In (1960)
Feb 1 all-day
Greensboro Woolworths Counter Sit-In (1960)

February 1, 1960: Four college students in Greensboro, North Carolina refuse to leave a Woolworth’s “whites only” lunch counter without being served. Their nonviolent demonstration sparks similar “sit-ins” throughout the city and in other states.

More Information: Greensboro Sit-in

World Interfaith Harmony Week (UN)
Feb 1 all-day
World Interfaith Harmony Week (UN)

The World Interfaith Harmony Week provides a platform—one week in a year—when all interfaith groups and other groups of goodwill can show the world what a powerful movement they are.
More information at: https://worldinterfaithharmonyweek.com/

Feb
2
Thu
2023 Dialogue Series: Indigenous Communities Part 1 @ online
Feb 2 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
2023 Dialogue Series: Indigenous Communities Part 1 @ online

OC Human Relations invites you to join us for our 2023 Dialogue Series. The annual observance of the “National Day of Racial Healing” was created with and builds on the work and learnings of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. You’re invited to join us for a series of conversations to further racial healing in your community.

The first of our dialogue series began January 17, 2023 – the National Day of Racial Healing. There will be two dialogues per month (on the same focused topic) during February, March, April & May.

The February dialogue highlights Indigenous Communities, there are 2 parts to the dialogue, the event on February 2nd is the first part. While it’s recommended you attend both Part 1 and Part 2, it is not essential and you may register for one or the other if you prefer.

Click here to learn more.

Feb
4
Sat
Rosa Parks Day
Feb 4 all-day
Rosa Parks Day

Rosa Parks Day is an American observance to honor civil rights activist Rosa Parks, who was known for refusing to give up her seat on a bus. It is a legal observance in California on February 4 and Ohio on December 1. Rosa Parks Day promotes equal opportunities, civil rights, and fairness across communities in the U.S. Church leaders, politicians, and organizational leaders unite to promote the day with a range of events and activities.

Learn more about Rosa Parks Day

Feb
7
Tue
National Black HIV/Aids Awareness Day
Feb 7 all-day
National Black HIV/Aids Awareness Day

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is an annual opportunity to help reduce HIV among African Americans by promoting HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. National HIV prevention efforts are reducing the burden of HIV infection among some African Americans, but more progress is needed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2018, blacks/African Americans accounted for 13% of the U.S. population but 42% of the 37,832 new HIV diagnoses in the United States and dependent areas.

Learn more

Feb
9
Thu
2023 Dialogue Series: Indigenous Communities Part 2 @ online
Feb 9 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
2023 Dialogue Series: Indigenous Communities Part 2 @ online

OC Human Relations invites you to join us for our 2023 Dialogue Series. The annual observance of the “National Day of Racial Healing” was created with and builds on the work and learnings of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. You’re invited to join us for a series of conversations to further racial healing in your community.

The first of our dialogue series began January 17, 2023 – the National Day of Racial Healing. There will be two dialogues per month (on the same focused topic) during February, March, April & May.

The February dialogue highlights Indigenous Communities, there are 2 parts to the dialogue, the event on February 9th is the 2nd part. While it’s recommended you attend both Part 1 and Part 2, it is not essential and you may register for one or the other if you prefer.

Click here to learn more.

Feb
18
Sat
Mendez vs Westminster Ruling
Feb 18 all-day
Mendez vs Westminster Ruling

Schools were still segregated in Westminster, CA, when Mexican-Puerto Rican Sylvia Mendez and her family came to town from Santa Ana in the 1940’s. When Mendez and her brothers were denied access to an all-white elementary school, her parents filed a lawsuit in Federal Court in Los Angeles against the school district. (Mendez vs. Westminster)

On February 18, 1946, Judge Paul McCormick ruled in favor of Mendez, making her one of the first Hispanics to attend an all-white school. Mendez’s case ended de jure segregation in California, setting a precedent for Brown vs. Board of Education seven years later, which brought an end to school segregation in the entire country.

On Feb 15, 2011, Sylvia Mendez received a Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama at the White House. Mendez vs. Westminster was awarded a OC Human Relations Award in 2014.

Feb
19
Sun
Japanese-Americans Interned (1942)
Feb 19 all-day
Japanese-Americans Interned (1942)

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, which allowed local military commanders to designate “military areas” as “exclusion zones,” from which “any or all persons may be excluded.” Accordingly, 127,000 US residents of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were US citizens, were removed from the Pacific Coast. They would be interned in “relocation” camps in the interior portions of the country, with little regard for the significant loss of property and assets and the disruption of traditional family structure this caused.

Learn more

Feb
20
Mon
World Day for Social Justice (UN)
Feb 20 all-day
World Day for Social Justice (UN)

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of our global mission to promote development and human dignity. The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice. The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. The ILO estimates that currently about 2 billion people live in fragile and conflict-affected situations, of whom more than 400 million are aged 15 to 29.

Job creation, better quality jobs, and better access to jobs for the bottom 40 per cent have the potential to increase incomes and contribute to more cohesive and equitable societies and thus are important to prevent violent conflicts and to address post-conflict challenges.

More info at: https://www.un.org/en/observances/social-justice-day

Mar
1
Wed
Women’s History Month
Mar 1 all-day
Women's History Month

March has been declared Women’s History Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of women whose commitment to nature and the planet have proved invaluable to society.

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.” Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as “Women’s History Week.” In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, Presidents Clinton, Bush, Obama and Trump have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

Read more in Law Library of Congress’ guide to the legislative history of Women’s History Month.

Mar
2
Thu
2023 Dialogue Series: Black/African American Communities Part 1 @ online
Mar 2 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
2023 Dialogue Series: Black/African American Communities Part 1 @ online

OC Human Relations invites you to join us for our 2023 Dialogue Series. The annual observance of the “National Day of Racial Healing” was created with and builds on the work and learnings of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. You’re invited to join us for a series of conversations to further racial healing in your community.

The first of our dialogue series began January 17, 2023 – the National Day of Racial Healing. There will be two dialogues per month (on the same focused topic) during February, March, April & May.

The March dialogue highlights the experiences of the Black/African American communities. The March 2 event is the first part of the dialogue, the 2nd will be held on March 9. While it’s recommended you attend both, it is not mandatory.

Click here to learn more.