Jul
6
Wed
Dialogue on Systemic Racism @ Online
Jul 6 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Dialogue on Systemic Racism @ Online

We invite you to continue the conversation that began on May 26 with the discussion of “Who We Are” in this four-part FREE Dialogue Series based on themes from Who We Are.

The topic of this dialogue is “Systemic Racism”

Register Now

Jul
15
Fri
Hate Happens Here Townhall @ Soka University
Jul 15 @ 8:30 am – 1:00 pm
Hate Happens Here Townhall @ Soka University | Aliso Viejo | California | United States

OC Human Relations Council invites you to Hate Happens Here: OC’s Call to Action

Coming up with solutions for addressing hate is a multi-pronged strategy.

The townhall is intended to go beyond understanding that hate exists, how it manifests and sharing promising strategies locally and nationally on responding and preventing hate motivated behaviours and hate activity.
This townhall is intended to empower stakeholders, leaders and residents on action items that can be implemented individually and collectively to address hate.

Soka University, Linus & Ava Helen Pauling Hall 216
1 University Drive, Aliso Viejo CA 92656
Parking in Lot A

REGISTER

 

Jul
18
Mon
Nelson Mandela Day
Jul 18 all-day
Nelson Mandela Day

July 18 is an annual, international, celebration of Nelson Mandela’s life and a global call to action for people to recognize their individual power to make an imprint change the world around them. Nelson Mandela International Day was launched in recognition of Nelson Mandela’s birthday on 18 July, 2009 via unanimous decision of the UN General Assembly.

It was inspired by a call Nelson Mandela made a year earlier, for the next generation to take on the burden of leadership in addressing the world’s social injustices when he said that “it is in your hands now”. It is more than a celebration of Madiba’s life and legacy. It is a global movement to honour his life’s work and act to change the world for the better.

Learn more about Nelson Mandela Day

 

Jul
20
Wed
Dialogue on “Relationships and Allyships” @ Online
Jul 20 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Dialogue on "Relationships and Allyships" @ Online

We invite you to continue the conversation that began on May 26 with the discussion of “Who We Are” in this four-part FREE Dialogue Series based on themes from Who We Are.

The topic of this dialogue is “Relationships & Allyships”

Register Now

Jul
26
Tue
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Signing Anniversary
Jul 26 all-day
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Signing Anniversary

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law on July 26, 1990. The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else. The ADA gives civil rights protections to individuals with disabilities similar to those provided to individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age, and religion. It guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in public accommodations, employment, transportation, state and local government services, and telecommunications. The ADA is divided into five titles (or sections) that relate to different areas of public life.

Learn more: Americans with Disabilities Act

Segregation Ends in Armed Forces (1948)
Jul 26 all-day
Segregation Ends in Armed Forces (1948)
July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman issues Executive Order 9981 to end segregation in the Armed Services. Executive Order 9981 declared “that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin.” In short, it was an end to racial segregation in the military, a political act unmatched since the days of Reconstruction after the Civil War.
Jul
30
Sat
World Day Against Trafficking in Persons
Jul 30 all-day
World Day Against Trafficking in Persons

Trafficking in persons is a serious crime and a grave violation of human rights. Every year, thousands of men, women and children fall into the hands of traffickers, in their own countries and abroad. Almost every country in the world is affected by trafficking, whether as a country of origin, transit or destination for victims. UNODC, as guardian of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC) and the Protocols thereto, assists States in their efforts to implement the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons (Trafficking in Persons Protocol).

The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons defines Trafficking in Persons as the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs.

LEARN MORE

Aug
2
Tue
Francisco Torres Lynched in Santa Ana (1892)
Aug 2 all-day
Francisco Torres Lynched in Santa Ana (1892)

On July 31, 1892, Francisco Torres, a Mexican laborer of the Modjeska Ranch, had an argument with William McKelvey, the ranch’s foreman. McKelvey had deducted a weekly $2.50 poll tax from his wages. Torres did not understand the reason for the deduction and felt cheated. Torres confronted McKelvey which resulted in McKelvey’s murder.

McKelvey’s murder had residents upset because he was very well known and liked. Torres fled but was captured by the San Diego Sheriff, who turned him over to Sheriff Lacy in Santa Ana. Torres was incarcerated. In the early morning of August 2, 1892 a mob of men with covered faces dragged Torres from his jail cell while calling him racial epithets and carried him to a telephone pole at Fourth and Sycamore Streets in Santa Ana and hanged him.

Aug
6
Sat
Voting Act of 1965 Signed
Aug 6 all-day
Voting Act of 1965 Signed
August 6, 1965: President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to prevent the use of literacy tests as a voting requirement. It also allowed federal examiners to review voter qualifications and federal observers to monitor polling places.
Aug
12
Fri
International Youth Day
Aug 12 all-day
International Youth Day

In 1999, the General Assembly endorsed the recommendation made by the World Conference of Ministers Responsible for Youth (Lisbon, 8-12 August 1998) that 12 August be declared International Youth Day.

International Youth Day is observed annually on August 12th. It is meant as an opportunity for governments and others to draw attention to youth issues worldwide. During IYD, concerts, workshops, cultural events, and meetings involving national and local government officials and youth organizations take place around the world. International Youth Day (IYD) gives an opportunity to celebrate and mainstream young peoples’ voices, actions and initiatives, as well as their meaningful, universal and equitable engagement.

Learn more

Aug
18
Thu
19th Amendment (Giving Women the Vote) Ratified (1920)
Aug 18 all-day
19th Amendment (Giving Women the Vote) Ratified (1920)

Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919 and ratified on August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment prohibited any U.S. citizen from being denied the right to vote on the basis of sex. Immediately, it granted 26 million women (half of the population at the time) the right to vote.

Learn more

Aug
19
Fri
World Humanitarian Day (UN)
Aug 19 all-day
World Humanitarian Day (UN)

Celebrated every year on 19 August, World Humanitarian Day is directed towards honoring humanitarian efforts worldwide and propagating the idea of supporting people in crisis. On this day, OCHA advocates on behalf of the entire humanitarian community.

World Humanitarian Day 2021 – Global Challenge for Climate Action

The climate emergency is wreaking havoc across the world at a scale that people on the front lines and in the humanitarian community cannot manage. Time is already running out for the world’s most vulnerable people — those who have contributed least to the global climate emergency yet are hit the hardest — and millions of others that are already losing their homes, their livelihoods, and their lives.

With most climate campaigns focused on slowing climate change and securing the planet’s future, World Humanitarian Day 2021, will highlight the immediate consequences of the climate emergency for the world’s most vulnerable people and ensure that their voices are heard, and their needs top the agenda at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in November.

Therefore, everyone is invited to join #TheHumanRace, which is the global challenge for climate action in solidarity with people who need it the most; and to put the needs of climate-vulnerable people front and centre at the UN climate summit (COP26).

Stand in solidarity with the world’s most vulnerable people by using these hashtags in your social media activities #TheHumanRace #WorldHumanitarianDay

Learn more at Humanitarian Day