Jul
18
Sat
Nelson Mandela Day
Jul 18 all-day
Nelson Mandela Day

July 18 is an annual, international, celebration of Nelson Mandela’s life and a global call to action for people to recognize their individual power to make an imprint change the world around them. Nelson Mandela International Day was launched in recognition of Nelson Mandela’s  birthday on 18 July, 2009 via unanimous decision of the UN General Assembly.

It was inspired by a call Nelson Mandela made a year earlier, for the next generation to take on the burden of leadership in addressing the world’s social injustices when he said that “it is in your hands now”.   It is more than a celebration of Madiba’s life and legacy. It is a global movement to honour his life’s work and act to change the world for the better.

Learn more about Nelson Mandela Day

 

Jul
26
Sun
Segregation Ends in Armed Forces (1948)
Jul 26 all-day
Segregation Ends in Armed Forces (1948)
July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman issues Executive Order 9981 to end segregation in the Armed Services
Aug
2
Sun
Francisco Torres Lynched in Santa Ana (1892)
Aug 2 all-day
Francisco Torres Lynched in Santa Ana (1892)

On July 31, 1892, Francisco Torres, a Mexican laborer of the Modjeska Ranch, had an argument with William McKelvey, the ranch’s foreman. McKelvey had deducted a weekly $2.50 poll tax from his wages. Torres did not understand the reason for the deduction and felt cheated. Torres confronted McKelvey which resulted in McKelvey’s murder.

McKelvey’s murder had residents upset because he was very well known and liked. Torres fled but was captured by the San Diego Sheriff, who turned him over to Sheriff Lacy in Santa Ana. Torres was incarcerated. In the early morning of August 2, 1892 a mob of men with covered faces dragged Torres from his jail cell while calling him racial epithets and carried him to a telephone pole at Fourth and Sycamore Streets in Santa Ana and hanged him.

Aug
6
Thu
Voting Act of 1965 Signed
Aug 6 all-day
Voting Act of 1965 Signed
August 6, 1965: President Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to prevent the use of literacy tests as a voting requirement. It also allowed federal examiners to review voter qualifications and federal observers to monitor polling places.
Aug
18
Tue
19th Amendment (Giving Women the Vote) Ratified (1920)
Aug 18 all-day
19th Amendment (Giving Women the Vote) Ratified (1920)

Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919 and ratified on August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment prohibited any U.S. citizen from being denied the right to vote on the basis of sex. Immediately, it granted 26 million women (half of the population at the time) the right to vote.

Learn more

Aug
19
Wed
World Humanitarian Day (UN)
Aug 19 all-day
World Humanitarian Day (UN)

Celebrated every year on 19 August, World Humanitarian Day is directed towards honoring humanitarian efforts worldwide and propagating the idea of supporting people in crisis. On this day, OCHA advocates on behalf of the entire humanitarian community.

World Humanitarian Day 2019 is set to celebrate Women Humanitarians and their undying contribution in making the world a better place. Women Humanitarians hold a sense of unparalleled uniqueness, one that adds to the global momentum of female strength, power and perseverance. It is time to honor the women who have acted as first responders to the darkest hours of crisis.

Learn more at https://www.un.org/en/events/humanitarianday/

Aug
23
Sun
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition
Aug 23 all-day
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition

August 23 is UNESCO’S International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition. This day pays tribute to all those who fought for freedom, and, in their name, to continue teaching about their story and the values therein. Today is meant to inspire us in the fight against all forms of servitude, racism, prejudice, racial discrimination and social injustice that are a legacy of slavery.

Learn more about this day on the UNESCO website.

Aug
24
Mon
Doss et al v. Bernal et al Decision (1943)
Aug 24 all-day
Doss et al v. Bernal et al Decision (1943)

In 1943, Alejandro Bernal, a native Californian, and his family moved to a house on Ash Avenue in the Sunnyside neighborhood of Fullerton. Bernal’s neighbors in this predominantly white community feared that the presence of Mexicans in their neighborhood would lower their property values.

Failing to prevent them from moving in, the white residents filed an injunction against the family, requesting their removal from the house. They relied on a clause written into the deeds of lots for sale in Fullerton neighborhoods that supported residential segregation in housing covenants. The Bernals refused to vacate their new home, and sought redress in court.

On August 24, 1943, Judge Albert A. Ross of the OC Superior Court rendered a decision in the case of Doss et al v. Bernal et al, ensuring the Bernals’ right to keep their home. In reaching his decision, Judge Ross confirmed his constitutional objection to racially restrictive covenants against Mexicans as violative of the 14th Amendment. These same legal arguments would serve as persuasive precedent in overturning racial covenants on a national level, and formed the basis for overturning the educational segregation of California’s Mexican students in Mendez v. Westminster

Learn More

Aug
26
Wed
Women’s Equality Day
Aug 26 all-day
Women’s Equality Day

Women’s Equality Day is celebrated in the United States on August 26 to commemorate the 1920 adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution, which prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was first celebrated in 1973 and is proclaimed each year by the United States President.

August 26th is the anniversary of national woman suffrage.  Across the seventy-two years between the first major women’s rights conference at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848, and the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, thousands of people participated in marches through cities like New York and Washington DC, wrote editorials and pamphlets, gave speeches all over the nation, lobbied political organizations, and held demonstrations with the goal of achieving voting rights for women.

Women also picketed the White House with questions like, “Mr. President, what are you going to do about woman’s suffrage?” “Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?”  This was the first time in history that a group of people picketed the White House.

Learn more at: Women’s Equality Day

Aug
28
Fri
March On Washington (1963)
Aug 28 all-day
March On Washington (1963)
August 28, 1963: Approximately 250,000 people take part in The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Martin Luther King gives the closing address in front of the Lincoln Memorial and states, “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’”
Sep
4
Fri
Little Rock Nine (1957)
Sep 4 all-day
Little Rock Nine (1957)
September 4, 1957: Nine black students known as the “Little Rock Nine,” are blocked from integrating into Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. President Dwight D. Eisenhower eventually sends federal troops to escort the students, however, they continue to be harassed
Sep
5
Sat
International Day of Charity
Sep 5 all-day
International Day of Charity

The United Nation’s International Day of Charity is observed annually on 5 September. The prime purpose of the International Day of Charity is to raise awareness and provide a common platform for charity related activities all over the world for individuals, charitable, philanthropic and volunteer organizations for their own purposes on the local, national, regional and international level.

Make a difference – volunteer in your community, make a donation to your favorite charity and if you’d like to help support OC Human Relations, please click here